Fall Risks for Older Adults

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Activities that take place in the bathroom, such as showering and bathing, are a simple part of most peoples’ daily routine. Yet, slips in the tub and falls in the shower or from the toilet may cause serious injuries.

CDC Research

According to a new CDC study published in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), an estimated 234,000 people ages 15 and older were treated in U.S. emergency departments (ED) in 2008 for injuries that occurred in bathrooms. Four out of 5 of these injuries were caused by falls—which can have especially serious consequences for older adults.

Almost one-third (30 percent) of adults aged 65 and above who were injured in bathrooms were diagnosed with fractures. Among adults aged 85 and older, 38 percent were hospitalized as a result of their injuries.

Steps for Safety in the Bathroom

Certain home safety measures may reduce the risk for all household members of being injured in the bathroom. Some prevention strategies include:

  • Adding non-slip surfaces and grab bars inside and outside the tub or shower to reduce slips and falls.
  • Installing grab bars next to the toilet for added support, if needed.

Preventing Falls Among Older Adults

Four out of five injuries that took place in bathrooms in 2008 were the result of falls. Falls can be especially dangerous for adults ages 65 and older.

Older adults can take steps to make falls less likely. If you are 65 or older, take the following steps to reduce your risk of falling:

Get some exercise: Lack of exercise can lead to weak legs, which increases the chance of falling. Exercise programs like Tai Chi can increase strength as well as improve balance, making falls less likely for aging adults.

Be mindful of medications: Some medicines—or combinations of medicines— can have side effects like dizziness or drowsiness. This can make falls more likely. Having a doctor or pharmacist review all your medications can help reduce the chance of risky side effects and drug interactions.

Keep your vision sharp: Poor vision can make it harder to get around safely. To help make sure you’re seeing clearly, have your eyes checked every year and wear glasses or contact lenses with the right prescription strength.

Eliminate hazards at home: About half of all falls happen at home. A home safety check can help identify fall hazards, like clutter and poor lighting that should be removed or changed.

Source: https://caregiver.com/articles/fall-risks-seniors/

Dave Nassaney

Caregiver's Caregiver at Dave, The Caregiver's Caregiver
Join Dave Nassaney, The Caregiver's Caregiver, author of numerous articles and books, speaker, life coach, and radio talk-show host for caregivers who are burned out, but his most important role is being a caregiver to his lovely wife, Charlene.

His upcoming book, "It's My Life, Too! Reclaim Your Caregiver Sanity by Learning When To Say Yes - When To Say No In Long Term Caregiving" is designed to teach caregivers who are taking care of their loved ones (due to an illness or disability) how to take care of themselves FIRST. If they don't learn this, they will likely suffer burnout and become as helpless as the person they are caring for.

Tune in every Wednesdays at 12:00 pm, PST, for interviews with experts in the caregiving field, as they discuss topics of great interest to caregivers, which will help them avoid burnout. The call in number to listen is (480) 945 0442.

Recorded podcasts can be found at www.DaveTheCaregiversCaregiver.com after each interview date.
Dave Nassaney
Dave Nassaney
Join Dave Nassaney, The Caregiver's Caregiver, author of numerous articles and books, speaker, life coach, and radio talk-show host for caregivers who are burned out, but his most important role is being a caregiver to his lovely wife, Charlene. His upcoming book, "It's My Life, Too! Reclaim Your Caregiver Sanity by Learning When To Say Yes - When To Say No In Long Term Caregiving" is designed to teach caregivers who are taking care of their loved ones (due to an illness or disability) how to take care of themselves FIRST. If they don't learn this, they will likely suffer burnout and become as helpless as the person they are caring for. Tune in every Wednesdays at 12:00 pm, PST, for interviews with experts in the caregiving field, as they discuss topics of great interest to caregivers, which will help them avoid burnout. The call in number to listen is (480) 945 0442. Recorded podcasts can be found at www.DaveTheCaregiversCaregiver.com after each interview date.

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